A volunteers guide to the top 7 getaways in Namibia

If you happen to be volunteering in Namibia or at one of our two projects situated in Namibia, Conserving Wildlife in Namibia or Conserving Desert Elephants, we recommend that you spend some time exploring this magnificent country. To visit Namibia is to experience a country of huge blue skies, endless horizons, amazing sand dunes, a harsh but beautiful coastline, and a landscape full of game reserves.

I have heard many people say that Namibia is their favourite destination that they have ever travelled to and the most different, and extraordinarily beautiful country. Namibia is the second-lowest populated country in the world with just 3.13 people per square kilometre, this allows most of Namibia to still be vastly unpopulated. Namibia is also home to 25% of the world’s wild cheetah population which you can experience at Conserving Wildlife in Namibia, the project work hard to conserve the wild cheetah populations of Namibia.

In my opinion, here are a few bucket list places to see in Namibia.

1. Climb the Big Daddy at Sossusvlei

A visit to Namibia is incomplete without a visit to the Sossusvlei and this is easily accessible as day trips are offered from our Conserving Wildlife in Namibia project. The Sossusvlei is a salt and clay pan that is surrounded by huge red sand dunes and is situated in the southern part of the Namib desert, in the Namib-Naukluft National Park. A visit here is not complete without climbing Big Daddy, the world’s tallest dune, and gazing out over a sea of dunes that disappear into the western horizon. You can also view this magnificent landscape from the air in a hot-air horizon.

2. Safari at Etosha National Park

We know that most people who visit Africa want to see the exquisite wildlife that’s on offer. Etosha National Park is one of Africa’s greatest game reserves and a confident choice for your African safari experience. The park carries a diverse range of animals, including four of the big five (elephants, lion, leopard, black and white rhino), many antelope species, cheetah, brown and spotted hyena as well as an impressive mammal count, 114 to be exact. The park’s birdlife is equally as impressive with 340 species.

3. Explore the Skeleton Coast

Dunes meet the sea at a great halfway point between Sossusvlei and Etosha.  Swakopmund is the base from which most people explore the Skeleton Coast, and this is also your starting point for your Conserving Desert Elephant experience. There is so much to do in the area, such as desert tours, sea kayaking, quad biking, sandboarding, and much more. This can all be organized for you when joining Conserving Desert Elephants.

4. Discover the Fish River Canyon

The Fish River Canyon, located in the South of Namibia, is enormous (the second largest canyon in the world, after the Grand Canyon) and ever so fascinating. Eerie in its isolation, you won’t be fighting over a viewpoint here (lucky for you). There is also a hike along the canyon, for further information, follow here.

5. Caprivi

The Caprivi region is the more affordable version of the Okavango Delta in Botswana, it’s even on the same floodplain and the same animals move between the two areas. Head off-the-beaten-track to this amazing area, filled with wildlife on dense floodplains.

6. The Kalahari

Want to get away from it all? The Kalahari is a semi-arid sandy savannah area in Southern Africa. This area of red-dunes and swaying grasses is for the escapists. Home of the San, the Kalahari is also home to a range of wildlife, including the ever so popular meerkat.

7. Damaraland

If you’re Conserving Desert Elephants with us, you’ll be lucky enough to experience the breathtaking mountainous region of Damaraland without having to take a tour or self-drive. You’ll be based in Damaraland for your 2-week stay and experience the desert-adapted elephant populations and if you’re lucky, rhino, lions as well as oryx, springbok and many bird species. Damaraland is different and incredibly fascinating with its khaki plains and every type of brown, from dark russet to bleached blonde.

By Bianca Eke, Conservation Experience Consultant for Worldwide Experience 

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